Your Daily Dose of Financial News

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Monsanto’s (and, in turn, Bayer AG’s) terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day in court over its Roundup products’ links to cancer continued yesterday, as a jury awarded $80 million to the California man who it had already found contracted cancer from his exposure to Roundup weedkillers – WSJ and Bloomberg and MarketWatch

Prime Minister May threw in an odd incentive in order to persuade British lawmakers who have twice rejected her Brexit plan to vote for it: her own resignation. Yesterday, Ms. May promised that she would step down if Parliament accepted her withdrawal plan (though it’s unclear whether Speaker Bercow will even entertain another vote on her plan) – NYTimes and WSJ and Bloomberg and Marketplace

Health insurer Centene has agreed to buy WellCare, “a smaller publicly held insurer based in Florida” for a reported $15.3 billion as part of a deal that “would create a health care giant that specialized in offering private health plans under the enormous government programs Medicare and Medicaid” – NYTimes

Some at the Fed, including Dallas Fed President Robert Kaplan, are pushing back on calls to begin cutting U.S. interest rates “despite rising market speculation of such a move because of slowing global growth” – WSJ

Europe’s AML crisis continues, and Swedbank AB CEO Birgitte Bonnesen is the latest casualty. The Stockholm-based lender fired its chief exec today “amid allegations the bank was used to launder billions of dollars in Russian money on her watch” – Bloomberg

It’s a bit early to tell how big a role the “special relationship” played in its findings, but British authorities appeared to come down on the US side of things in finding “significant” security issues with Huawei’s telecom equipment. Still, the UK has stopped short of calling for an outright Huawei ban – NYTimes and WSJ and Bloomberg

A pair of pension funds has filed a SDNY-based class action accusing “more than a dozen investment banks of rigging prices for bonds issued by government-backed mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac” – Law360

Mattress startup Casper has joined the unicorn club with a fresh valuation round that brought in $100 million to the direct-to-consumer online venture that’s now topped $1.1 billion in value – Bloomberg

A few more thoughts on the coming Lyft IPO – MarketWatch

The SEC got a (rare, these days) SCOTUS win this week in its “copy-paste” fraud case against Francis Lorenzo, a former investment banker who the agency “found had violated federal securities laws by knowingly blasting out email sales pitches to investors containing false information, which he said had been supplied by his boss” – Law360

More McDonald’s moves, and this time concerning real live human workers. The fast food giant announced this week that it will “no longer lobby against minimum-wage increases at the federal, state or local levels,” a significant shift that was “simultaneously cheered by supporters of higher pay and criticized as a publicity stunt by some in the restaurant industry” – NYTimes

With no signs of a public offering in sight, Saudi Aramco is taking a different tack, diversifying through acquisition—in this case, buying a 70% stake in Sabic (the kingdom’s petrochemicals firm) for just shy of $70 billion – WSJ and NYTimes

Odds are you’ll be hearing a bit about “St. Louis style” on the webs these days.  Just go ahead and start shaking your head now – Mashable

MDR

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